A long time ago, drastic climate changes may have played a role in reptile evolution.

A long time ago, drastic climate changes may have played a role in reptile evolution.

A new study published in the journal Science suggests that the rate of climate change may play just as large a role in speeding up evolution as mass extinctions. The study, conducted by a team of international researchers, used a computer model to simulate the effects of both mass extinctions

Reptiles are a type of vertebrate that includes snakes, crocodiles, lizards, and turtles. They are ectotherms, meaning that they rely on external sources, such as the sun, to regulate their body temperature. Reptiles are thought to have evolved from amphibians during the Carboniferous period, which was a time of great change for life on Earth. The study of reptile evolution is important for understanding the history of life on our planet.

A new study has found that there is a correlation between the evolutionary diversity of reptiles and the fluctuations in climate throughout the Permian period. The study, which was published in Science Advances, analyzed the fossils of 125 different reptile species and found that there was a close relationship between the two. This is an important discovery because it helps to explain why there

Scientists' understanding of evolution is constantly expanding as they uncover more clues about the connection between evolution and environmental change. This new study is likely to become an important part of that conversation, as it provides valuable insights into this complex relationship. Jessica Whiteside, a geologist at the University of Southampton in England who works on mass

By studying the fossils of reptiles that lived millions of years ago, scientists can learn about the evolution of these creatures. In a new study, researchers looked at fossils of reptiles that lived between 294 and 237 million years ago. They measured and scanned the fossils, and looked at climate data to see how the climate may have affected the reptiles. The study found that the reptiles evolved slowly

Previous research has found that body size and shape in reptiles is highly sensitive to changes in temperature. So, the team used fossils to reconstruct body and head size in two different lineages of reptiles over time. They also looked at how these body sizes changed in relation to temperature changes that occurred during the same time periods. The results showed that body and head size in reptiles increased at a rate that was two to three times faster during periods of rapid climate change than during periods of slower change. The findings

A few species of reptiles evolved at a slower rate than their kin, due to their size. Small-bodied reptiles are preadapted to live in rapidly warming climates, as they have a greater surface area to body ratio. This allows them to better exchange heat with their surrounding environment, so they stay relatively cooler than larger animals.

The study found that the smaller reptiles were under less pressure from natural selection to change, while the large reptiles were under more pressure to change or face extinction. Simões says this is likely because the large reptiles had to compete with other large animals for food

The so-called "Lilliput effect" has been well-documented in marine organisms, but this is the first time it has been quantified in land-dwelling vertebrates. This phenomenon refers to the observation that

Simões and colleagues have refined the complex evolutionary tree for reptiles and their ancestors. Their work suggests that both open ecological niches and dramatic climate fluctuations played a role in reptile evolution long ago. It's unclear which played a bigger role, but both were important factors in the evolution of reptiles

We cannot say which one was more important, Simões says. Without either one, the course of evolution in the Triassic and the rise of reptiles to global dominance in terrestrial ecosystems would have been quite different.

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