As early as 8 million years ago, fossil finds have put gibbons in Asia.

As early as 8 million years ago, fossil finds have put gibbons in Asia.

The gibbon is a small-bodied, long-armed ape that swings rapidly through the trees, far outpacing scientists’ attempts to

According to researchers, partial upper jaw and seven isolated teeth found near a southwestern Chinese village suggest that the earliest known gibbons hung out there about 7 million to 8 million years ago. The findings, published in the October edition of the Journal of Human Evolution, add weight to

The fossils, which include a nearly complete skull, a lower jaw and several teeth, are about 11.6 million years old and represent the oldest-known hylobatid species, the researchers report online today in Science. "This is a very important discovery," says primatologist Christopher Beard of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, who was not involved

A new study has revealed that an ancient Chinese gibbon species may have gone extinct due to human activity. The research, published in the journal Science Advances, provides the first

The fossilized remains of an infant's upper jaw, containing four teeth, have been discovered in China. The jawbone was found by a local villager and given to Ji during fieldwork around a decade ago. The partly erupted molar helped researchers identify it as the remains of

The Y. xiaoyuan gibbon, which roamed what is now central China some 16 million to 20 million years ago, is more closely related to present-day gibbons than Kapi is, the researchers report October 14 in Science Advances. The findings suggest that the earliest known members of the gibbon family diverged from other apes much earlier than previously thought. The researchers analyzed teeth

The study of living primates suggested that hylobatids diverged from other apes in Africa between 22 million and 17 million years ago. However, when gibbon ancestors arrived in Eurasia is still unknown, says Terry Harrison, paleoanthropologist and study coauthor of New York University. There is a 10 million year gap in the fossil records between the estimated time when hylobatids emerged in

A new study has found evidence that a species of gibbon that lived around 8 million years ago may have been the ancestor of all later gibbons. The study, published in the journal Science, analyzed the genomes of modern gibbons and compared them to the genome of a gibbon that

The research team discovered that the bumps and depressions on the chewing surfaces and other tooth and jaw features of Y. xiaoyuan are much like those of living gibbons. They also found that some traits of the fossil species were precursors of

The researchers found that Y. xiaoyuan was a fruit-eating gibbon, based on the size and structure of its molars. This is similar to most gibbon species today, which focus on

Ji's group has provided strong evidence that Y. xiaoyuan is a hylobatid, according to paleoanthropologist David Alba of Instit

But the evolutionary status of K. ragnagarensis remains unsettled because only a single tooth from that species has been found, says study author Juan Luis Arsuaga from the Compl

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