Astronomers saw dust in space for the first time being pushed by starlight.

Astronomers saw dust in space for the first time being pushed by starlight.

A new study has revealed how light pushes around matter in our galaxy. Using data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), astronomers have directly observed, for the first time, how

The radiation pressure from young stars can have a significant influence on the amount of dust that is able to remain in the vicinity. This in turn can affect the formation of new gas clouds around dying stars. A recent study has observed this effect in action in a stellar pair located 5,600 light-years away in the Cygnus constellation. The

Astronomers have long known that the dust emerging from the star WR 140 and its companion is formed by gas from these two stars colliding and condensing into soot. But images of the pair taken over the course of 16 years show that the dust is accelerating as it travels away from the stars.

Dust from distant stars is constantly bombarding Earth, according to a new study. The research, published in the journal Science, found that a stream of dust particles flows into our solar system from a nearby star at speeds of up to 10 million kilometers per hour.

In a new study, researchers have for the first time measured the acceleration of dust in a protoplanetary disk - the dense ring of dust and gas surrounding a young star and from which planets are born. The disk around the star MWC 480, located about 450 light-years away in the constellation Taurus, was observed over

The James Webb Space Telescope, or JWST, has captured images of the dusty layers around WR 140 and its companion that extend farther than any telescope could see before. These layers of dust are feeling the push of light and have been captured in high-resolution by the JWST. This is an exciting discovery as it allows us

The intricate patterns surrounding the stars resemble a gigantic spider web. However, upon closer inspection by researchers, it was revealed that they are actually enormous, expanding, cone-shaped dust shells. These shells are nested inside each other, with a new one forming every eight years as the stars complete another journey around their orbits. In the new images, the shells look like sections of rings because we observe them

The patterns around the stars in the image above don't form a complete circle because the distance between the stars changes as they orbit each other. The researchers expected that when the stars are further apart, the density of the colliding gas would be too low to cond

What surprised the researchers is that the gas doesn’t condense well when the stars are closest together either. That suggests there’s a “Goldilocks zone” for dust formation: Dust forms only when the separation between the stars is just right, creating a series

Astrophysicists Andy Pollock of the University of Sheffield in England and colleagues have discovered a new type of astronomical object they're calling a "Goldilocks zone." These objects are so named because they're "

In his work, Pollock has observed that WR 140 and its partner emit more X-rays as the stars approach each other, but then fewer as they get very close together, suggesting there’s a Goldilocks zone for X-rays coming from the stars as well. “It would be interesting to see if there’s any connection” between the two

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