Drone photos have revealed an early Mesopotamian city made of marsh islands.

Drone photos have revealed an early Mesopotamian city made of marsh islands.

The city, which was first settled around 2900 BCE, is located in the southeastern part of the country and is known as Warka, or Uruk to scholars. It was the largest city in the world at the time and home to some 50,000 people, according to the most recent estimate. The site

Remote sensing data, mostly gathered by a specially equipped drone, indicate that a vast urban settlement called Lagash largely consisted of four marsh islands connected by waterways, says anthropological archaeologist Emily Hammer of the University of Pennsylvania. These findings add crucial details to an emerging view that southern Mesopotamian cities did not, as traditionally thought, expand outward from temple and administrative districts into irrigated farmlands that were encircled by a single city wall

There are multiple ways that Lagash could have become a city of marsh islands due to human occupation and environmental change. Hammer says that this is evidence of the evolving ways that humans

Another had different topography, and might have been better suited for herding and agriculture. Lagash was a Mesopotamian city that was divided into distinct sections, each with its own economic activity. For example, one section may have been devoted to fishing and gathering reeds for

The ancient Mesopotamian city of Lagash was built on a series of marshy islands in the Tigris-Euphrates river delta. Two of these islands, which are now known as Tell el-Hiba and Tell el-Ouelli, show evidence of having been bordered by g

Drones have captured photographs of what are believed to be harbors on each marsh island. This suggests that boat travel was used to connect different city sectors. There are also remains of what may have been footbridges, which further excavations can

Lagash, one of the world's earliest states, was founded between 4,900 and 4,600 years ago. The site was abandoned by residents around 3,600 years ago. It was first excavated more than 40 years ago.

Mesopotamian cities were built on raised mounds in marshes, according to anthropological archaeologist Jennifer Pournelle of the University of South Carolina in Columbia. This is based on previous analyses of the timing of ancient wetlands expansions in southern Iraq, which indicated that Lagash and other southern Mesopotamian cities were built on raised mounds in marshes. S

Drones offer a more detailed view of buried structures than satellite images, according to Hammer. Guided by remote-sensing data gathered from ground level, a drone spent six weeks in 2019 taking high-resolution photographs of much of the site’s surface. Soil moisture and salt absorption from recent heavy rains helped the drone’s technology detect remnants of buildings, walls, streets,

Hammer used data from a drone to narrow down densely inhabited parts of the ancient city to three islands. She says that it is possible that those islands were part of delta channels extending toward the Persian Gulf. The fourth, smaller island was dominated by a large temple.

A recent drone survey of the ancient Mesopotamian city of Lagash has confirmed the existence of an extensive network of canals and waterways that once served as the lifeblood of the city. The

Lagash was a city-state in ancient Mesopotamia that was inhabited by different groups of people over the course of several centuries. The evidence of this can be seen in the contrasting neighborhoods on different marsh islands that have been discovered by archaeologists. Some of these neighborhoods look like they were planned out and organized, while

Lagash was once a bustling city with dense clusters of residences and other buildings. It is estimated that tens of thousands of people lived there during its heyday. The city covered an estimated 4 to 6 square kilometers, nearly the area of Chicago.

It has been unclear whether northern Mesopotamian cities from around 6,000 years ago, which were not located in marshes, contained separate city sectors. However, Lagash and other southern Mesopotamian cities likely exploited water transport and trade among closely spaced settlements, enabling unprecedented growth, says archaeologist

Lagash is an ancient city that was abandoned many years ago. However, it has been preserved and is now a popular tourist destination. The city was once part of a watery region, but as the years went on, it became less watery and other nearby cities began to expand and merge. Lagash is a rare opportunity to see what other ancient cities in the region

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