How living in a pandemic affects our sense of time.

How living in a pandemic affects our sense of time.

It feels like time has been standing still since spring 2020 for many people, myself included. In February 2020, during the Before Times, my family traveled to Barcelona, a relatively carefree trip that now feels like a lifetime ago. Other times, I feel like I blinked, and three years vanished. How can my son be starting fifth grade? He was a

Welcome to "blursday." Back when the pandemic started, the term hit the zeitgeist. The word captured that sense of time disintegrating as our worlds and routines turned upside down. Days melted together, then weeks,

As people began wondering about why time felt so out of whack, Simon Grondin, a psychologist at Laval University in Quebec City, and colleagues penned a theory paper seeking to explain the phenomenon. Our time is typically punctuated by events, such as dinner dates or daily commutes, Grondin and his team wrote in October 2020 in Frontiers in Psychology. Such events provide temporal landmarks. When those landmarks

Cognitive neuroscientists and psychologists have been scrambling to document people’s changing relationship with the clock since the initial shutdowns. Early findings from those efforts now confirm that the pandemic did lead many people worldwide to experience distortions in their perception of

The pandemic has led to a feeling of being out of sync for many people. Days may feel as if they are blurring together and the present may seem overly large. The future may feel uncertain. This is according to two surveys of more than 5,600 people taken during the first six months of the pandemic in the United States.

When the pandemic hit, it was like the world suddenly came to a stop. We suddenly found ourselves in uncharted territory, having to navigate a new reality where we couldn't be the people we used to

For some people, time may feel like it is moving in a strange, somewhat unsettling way. This can be a feeling that they can shake off. However, for others, the trauma of the past few years combined with this weird perception of time is a worrisome mix. This could be a sign of

Those who reported greater feelings of time distortion were found to be at higher risk of developing mental health problems. This was especially true for participants ages 18 to 29 and women. Previous life experience, including preexisting mental health challenges and high levels of lifetime stress or trauma, also heightened one’s likelihood

Dr. Holman first observed how a warped sense of time can hurt people’s well-being as a graduate student in the 1990s. For her dissertation, she interviewed survivors of the southern California fires of 1993 within days of the fires’ onset. She found that two years later, the individuals who had lost their sense of time during the fires still reported feeling greater distress than those

According to Dr. Melanie Salmon, people who have experienced temporal disintegration often get stuck in the past. They find it difficult to connect the dots between past experiences and present

Now Holman hopes that measuring how much people feel like time is falling apart during the pandemic might provide an early indicator of who might need help with recovery. This is an important idea

It seems that during these unprecedented times, our perception of time has a significant impact on our mental wellbeing. According to recent research, those who perceive time as moving slowly are more likely to experience mental distress than those who perceive it as moving quickly. This is likely due to the fact that those who feel like time is dragging are also

A year after the pandemic started, experimental psychologist Ruth Ogden of Liverpool John Moores University in England and colleagues asked almost 800 respondents in the United Kingdom to reflect on the start of the pandemic. Ogden and her team are seeking to understand how people might eventually remember the pandemic, and what that could mean for recovery.

It's been said that time flies when you're having fun. But according to a new study, time also seems to fly when you're stressed, bored, or unhappy. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Southern California, found that

It is common for people to feel that a traumatic event is much closer in the rearview mirror than it is in reality. This is because negative emotions can lengthen people's recovery from the event. The team suspects that this may be the case for people who are recovering from the pandemic. They write that "remember

Mindfulness training has been shown to be a promising way to overcome distortions in time perception. This is because mindfulness brings people back to the present moment, which can help to improve focus and concentration. Additionally,

The pandemic has left many people feeling stuck in a sort of limbo, unsure of what the future holds. While the answers for how to deal with this situation are far from clear, it is important to help people connect their past, present and future selves. This will allow them to see the pandemic in a wider perspective and eventually move on from it.

It is especially crucial for people's well-being to have a sense of tomorrow, according to research by Holman. He suggests that people must "have some sense

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