The US IRS has launched a security review after threats and misinformation on social media.

The US IRS has launched a security review after threats and misinformation on social media.

The Internal Revenue Service is currently reviewing its safety and security measures in response to an increased number of threats and pieces of misinformation about the agency and its employees circulating on social media, IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig said in a staff memo released on Tuesday

Rettig said the steps include new risk assessments, monitoring perimeter security at facilities, designating restricted areas and reassessing exterior lighting and entrance security. The actions follow "an abundance of misinformation and false social media postings, some of them with threats directed at the IRS and its employees,"

The misinformation and threats have been prompted by President Joe Biden's new tax, climate and drugs package that provides IRS with $80 billion in new funding over a decade to beef up enforcement. They follow an armed man's attack on an FBI office in Cincinnati and other threats in the wake of the FBI's search of former president Donald Trump's Florida home for documents earlier this month.

The recent claims by Republicans that the IRS is building an "army" of 87,000 "agents" are unfounded. The majority of the agency's decade-long gross hiring goal will be focused on replacing the over 50,000 retirees, improving customer service, and upgrading

The IRS is currently recruiting an army of 87,000 SPECIAL AGENTS, and according to Ronny Jackson, they're not going to be going after billionaires. Instead, they'll be targeting middle-class Americans. This is a cause for concern, as the agents are trained to use 'DEADLY FORCE

In a recent blog post, IRS Commissioner Rettig warned of potential threats to the agency and its staff. Rettig, a former Beverly Hills, California, tax attorney who was appointed to

In an email sent to the IRS's current 78,600 employees, Rettig asked them to increase their safety awareness and added, "if you see something, say something

Rettig continued, "I know that our agency's work is often misunderstood, and that we are not perfect. But I also know that the men and women of the IRS work hard every day to do the right thing."

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