Toyota brings its first main electric car as the wheels fall apart

Toyota brings its first main electric car as the wheels fall apart

Toyota is recalling its first mass-market electric vehicle and one of its full-size trucks due to problems that could cause loose nuts or bolts and loose wheels or axles.

Toyota has warned owners of the electric SUV BZ4X to stop driving because the wheels could fall off. Recently, SUVs began to be sold in the United States. The warnings and revocations announced Thursday by Toyota Motor Sales USA affect all approximately 260 BZ4X SUVs that have been delivered to customers to date.

Toyota said owners of the BZ4X should stop driving these vehicles immediately. The bolts that hold the wheels in place loosen even after a relatively short distance on the road, allowing the wheels to separate. Toyota is still investigating why and under what circumstances this may have happened. Toyota still doesn't know how to fix the problem, the automaker said. Until a solution is found, Toyota BZ4X dealers will take customers and bring them to the dealership, offering free rental cars for the time being, Toyota said. Toyota BZ4X and Subaru Subaru electric crossovers were jointly developed by these two Japanese car manufacturers. They are very similar to each other and in many ways similar. Subaru spokeswoman Jessica Dallman said in an email that Subaru has not issued a similar recall for Soldera because none have yet been delivered to customers in the United States.

The BZ4X is Toyota’s first electric vehicle to run entirely on batteries, rather than a modified version of the gasoline model. Toyota has already released an electric version of the Rav4 SUV in some markets.

Toyota in particular has announced a recall of about 46,000 2022 Toyota Tundra full-size vans due to loose rear axle mount nuts. According to Toyota, in some cases this can separate the axle base and affect the stability and braking of the truck. The company added that the Tundra problem is not related to the BZ4X issue. To fix the problem, Toyota dealers will inspect and tighten the bolts for free, Toyota said. Toyota said in its announcement that some parts can be replaced for free if necessary. However Toyota does not warn Tundra owners to immediately stop driving their trucks.

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