What happened to the Delaware-sized iceberg that broke off Antarctica?

What happened to the Delaware-sized iceberg that broke off Antarctica?

When Taylor Swift and Kanye West took the stage at the 2009 MTV Video Music

A68 was one of the largest icebergs ever recorded, and its calving was widely considered to be a sign of climate change. But the event was also remarkable for its location: It happened near the Antarctic Peninsula, one of the fastest-warming regions on Earth. At the time, A68

Polar scientist Alex Huth of Princeton University and colleagues have found that the largest remaining chunk of the original iceberg, Iceberg A68a, was caught in a tug-of-war of ocean currents, and the strain of those opposing forces probably pulled the iceberg apart. The team's findings are published in the October 19th issue of Science

When the A68 iceberg finally broke away from the Larsen C ice shelf in 2018, researchers were eager to learn more about the unique ecosystem that exists in the dark shadows beneath the ice. They were also curious to know why the iceberg took nearly a year to begin moving away from the shelf. Satellite images from December 2020 show that the A68 iceberg has finally begun to move and

The new simulations suggest that A68a probably met its fate due to the strong, fast-moving current it drifted into on December 20, 2020. The tension caused by the current rifted the berg, and the finger sheared off and broke apart within a few days.

Shear stress occurs when two opposing forces act upon an object in different directions. In the case of an iceberg, the two opposing forces are the wind and the water. The wind blows the iceberg in one direction while the water pushes against it in the opposite direction. This creates a shearing force that can break the iceberg

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